Joints are subject to damage from both injury and disease. When either occurs, movement is inhibited and pain is experienced. Like many complaints, the incidence is likely to increase with age, but what causes joint pain? What Causes Joint Pain? Those four little words, “both injury and disease,” cover a multitude of possibilities. The incidence of joint discomfort is extremely high, with one survey discovering a full third of adults suffering in the month preceding its random sampling. Strains and sprains are the most common causes of joint pain that isn’t associated with a disease. Diagnosable conditions which can present as joint pain include: Bursitis. An inflammatory condition affecting small, fluid-filled sacs located close to joints that perform frequent repetitive motion, bursitis occurs most commonly in the elbow, heel, hip, knee and shoulder. Gout. A type of arthritis, acute gout typically affects only one joint, where uric acid has built up in the blood causing joint Continue reading →

  The term pinched nerve, alternately called a “compressed nerve,” describes unusual and disproportionate pressure applied to a nerve. Simply put, nerves – bundles of fibers that transmit information – travel through the body inside the spine, and close to joints; always surrounded by other tissues including bone, cartilage, muscles, and tendons. They are, thus, vulnerable to pressure applied by those external elements, which can cause discomfort. That discomfort may be nothing more than a mild tingling, it can be numbness or weakness, or it can be extreme pain. Despite these wide-ranging symptoms, and the many ways and places this injury can be sustained, the symptoms of a pinched nerve are relatively consistent. Identifying the Symptoms of a Pinched Nerve Nerves are at their most vulnerable to compression where they travel through constricted spaces, and where they have little soft tissue to protect them. There is no way, beyond considering Continue reading →